Graphs - Strategic Plan

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Ohio independent colleges efficiently prepare students for degrees in STEM fields.

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Ohio's standing as a net importer of first-time, full-time freshmen increased markedly in the last two years.

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The Senate version of the two-year state of Ohio budget would raise financial aid for needy students to above $100 million for the first time in eight years.

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After the state cut financial aid six years ago, Ohio nonprofit colleges have stepped up to meet their students' financial needs.

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Newly available graduation rate data continues to show greater success by students who attend nonprofit colleges.

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The learning that occurs in liberal arts colleges remains extremely valuable in the employmnet marketplace.

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Students attending Ohio independent colleges have had their financial aid from the state of Ohio slashed by more than half in the last decade.

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Large proportions of Ohio high school graduates showing interest, whether direct or indirect, in science, technology, medical and health, engineering, or mathematics are not ready for college-level study in those areas.

To learn more about the different categories, visit the AICUO Blog.

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less need-based aid

Despite recent marginal increases, appropriations for need-based financial aid from the state of Ohio are lower than they were during the first year of Gov. George Voinovich's second term - even without accounting for inflation.

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Cost at public 4 for 0 EFC

In the five years since the radical cuts in state need-based aid, the net cost for a poor student to attend the average Ohio public university has more than quadrupled.

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Awards below bachelors at 4yr

Beyond the workplace's most essential credential, the bachelor's degree, Ohio's four-year colleges and universities also participate significantly in shorter-term education for specific workforce needs.

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Attainment Ohio v neighbors

Ohio and all its adjacent states continue to lag the US average for adults above age 25 with bachelor's or higher degrees.

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Share of degrees by field 12-13

As they have for many years, Ohio's independent colleges contribute more than their share of bachelor's degrees in areas of study important to the state's future.

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Foreign Students Benefit to Ohio

Over the last decade an increasing number of students from overseas study in Ohio, and last year they contributed 3/4 of a billion dollars to the state's and nation's economy.

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Ed attainment over time OH v US

The conundrum continues: Ohio's educational attainment is higher than the US average at the high school level, but lower at the baccalaureate level, and the gaps stubbornly remain.

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Faculty Attitudes MOOCs

The key actors on campus - faculty and technology experts - assess the value of online courses differently.

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Grad rate AICUO IUC OSU update to 2006 cohort

Four-year graduation rates have increased in Ohio's public sector, principally because of Ohio State's 14-year climb to the overall independent-college rate.

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State of residence for freshmen over time

Both public and private four-year campuses in Ohio are attracting increasing shares of entering first-year classes from out of state.

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Ohio residency for 2013

Ohio residents as a share of full-time undergraduates at independent colleges have dropped two percentage points since 2010.

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Need-based aid for 2013

The Ohio House Budget Committee has approved a small increase in funding for the Ohio College Opportunity Grant for the next two academic years.

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Out of state undergrads

Ohio independent colleges bring almost 35,000 out-of-state US citizens to study here - and they are more likely to stay after graduation.

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Completion rate at 4yr of 2yr students

Ohio lags the nation in the rate of students who start at community colleges and then complete a degree at a four-year college or university.

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Cost at public 4 for 0 EFC through 2012-13

In four years, the remaining cost for the state's neediest families to send a student to an Ohio public university, after state and federal financial aid, has quadrupled.

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Attainment by age Ohio v US

Although younger Ohioans are increasingly better educated, the stubborn gap between Ohio and national educational attainment remains.

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Institutional aid from Ohio public campuses

While independent colleges have long offered financial aid grants from their own resources, the state's public campuses - their tuition already lowered by taxpayer-funded institutional subsidies - are increasingly using merit-based and other grants for their own enrollment management purposes.

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change in per FTE

Over the last two decades, while the states' commitment to student financial aid, measured in constant dollars, doubled, Ohio's dropped by 40 percent.

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OCOG max

There is only slight improvement in next year's grants for Ohio's neediest students.

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cost to attend 4 yr vs fed aid

In just three years, state policy changes have led to the out-of-pocket cost for the state's neediest students of attending an Ohio public university to nearly quadruple.

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Choice v residency

The repeal two years ago of the Student Choice Grant, which supported Ohioans attending in-state independent colleges, eliminated a key incentive for students to stay in their home state for their education.

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attainment v job

Meeting the demand of Ohio's future labor market requires investment in students completing their degrees today.

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unemployment and enrollment

Even the fall 2009 spike in Ohio community-college enrollment - which followed the lifting of the two-year tuition freeze - can be accounted for, like most of the recent past, by a change in the state's unemploymnet rate.

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cost for neediest citizens

By redistributing its higher education funds to limit public-campus tuition increases and simulataneously slash need-based aid, the state of Ohio more than tripled the out-of-pocket tuition at the public baccalaureate campuses for its poorest citizens.

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state of alumni residence

Recent graduates of Ohio independent colleges are likely still to be in Ohio; each class's share of those remaining here after graduation is not only higher than that of all alumni/alumnae, but is at least as high as the share of Ohio residents in each class at enrollment.

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on-time grad rate compariosn

Ohio State's major effort to "enhance the quality of its undergraduate student population"* - using millions of dollars in merit aid and recruitment expenditures to raise the ACT scores of entering freshmen - props up the sector-wide rate of on-time bachelor's degree completions at Ohio's public universities. Even so, Ohio State and the public sector lag behind the independent sector in this important success measure.

* "Ohio State 2008: Bridging the Excellence Divide," by the OSU Enrollment Management Committee

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adult students

Ohio independent colleges' commitment to adult students has grown substantially in the last two decades.

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share of undergrad enrollment

Ohio's independent colleges and universities also do more than their share in meeting another state strategic higher education goal: educating adults seeking bachelor's degrees.

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out of state students

Ohio's independent colleges do more than their share of meeting one of the state's strategic higher education goals: attracting students from out of state.

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grad rate by income

A major new study of graduations at public colleges and universities - including Ohio's - offers further evidence of targeting student aid rather than tuition level in helping needy students complete their degrees. While net cost of attendance has no measurable effect in the graduation rates of well-off students seeking bachelor's degrees in the public sector, it has a major, statistically significant effect on those with the least ability to pay and the greatest need for financial aid.

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progress toward goal

Lifting the tuition freeze appears not to have damaged Ohio's public-sector enrollments for now, but the full effect will not become evident until announced tuition increases become effective in the winter or spring. The lion's share of the fall increase was at the two-year campuses - community college headcount jumped by nearly 17% and branch campus headcount by more than 11% over fall 2008.

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residency state

Large majorities of entering freshmen at both public and independent colleges are from Ohio, but independent-college students have a better chance of learning with someone from another part of the country.

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enrollment growth

In the last two years, the enrollment growth the state needs to meet the governor's strategic higher education goals has been concentrated, by policy and by the numbers, in the state's public campuses.

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enrollment goals

Enrollment last fall at the public University System of Ohio campuses increased by about 11,000 students - not even half of the growth required to reach the governor's goal of 230,000 more students by 2016.