Graphs - Comparison with For-profit Sector

Headcount change by sector 2012

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Headcount change by sector 2012

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Headcount change by sector 2012

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Headcount change by sector 2012

Three years after enrolling in a for-profit 4-year institution, one in seven of the entering class of 2011 had settled for an associate degree, and half had left higher education altogether with no credential.

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Headcount change by sector 2012

As in previous years, students who had started at an Ohio public college or university form the majority of transfers into Ohio independent colleges, but with a growing share coming from out of state.

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Headcount change by sector 2012

Debt for college graduates varies considerably by sector.

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Headcount change by sector 2012

Recently released student loan default rates showed reductions nationally and in all Ohio sectors.

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Headcount change by sector 2012

Students who start at Ohio public campuses form the majority of transfers into Ohio independent colleges and univiersities.

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Headcount change by sector 2012

Federal and state governments support Ohio's different types of higher education institutions differently.


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Headcount change by sector 2012

Among the benefits of attending an independent college: you are among the least likely to have trouble paying off your student loans.


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Headcount change by sector 2012

Fall 2013 was a down year in enrollments across all Ohio higher education sectors.

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STEM attrition by sector

Those who expect to earn a bachelor's degree in science, technology, engineering, or math need to carefully examine the success rates of the institutional sector they choose.

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cohort default rates for 2013

Unlike those of other sectors, independent colleges' student loan defualt rates (the percentage of students who are more than 270 days delinquent within two years of entering repayment) did not rise in the most recent federal data.

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A student who completes a degree or certificate at a for-profit college takes on more federal debt per credit than a student at an independent nonprofit college who does not complete.

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Headcount change by sector

While fall 2012 was not a good year for college enrollments in Ohio, there was considerable variation among sectors.

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Default rate of OCOG offering for profits

More than half of the for-profit colleges whose students receive Ohio College Opportunity Grant have three-year default rates that are higher than their sector's state and national average, and far above those of Ohio's independent and public colleges and universities.

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Default rate 3 yr Ohio v US

In the new three-year loan default rates, borrowers from Ohio independent colleges have a better record than those from other Ohio institutions and their nonprofit peers nationally.

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Median borrowed

Differences in loan burden do not account for the varying number of students by sector who borrow for college and do not complete their degrees, taking on debt without the benefit of a valuable credential.

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Volunteerism

Independent colleges inculcate values as well as knowledge.

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Time to Degree By Sector

It normally takes an extra year beyond the normal four to earn your bachelor's degree from a public college or university, while at a for-profit institution it takes more than two years longer.

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Income for degree & certificates by sector

The benefit earned as a result of workforce development such as a certificate and associate degree program varies depending on the sector where you choose to enroll.

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Gainful employment

Public and nonprofit colleges and universities nationwide had 43 percent of the vocational programs subject to gainful employment scrutiny, but none of those that failed to meet all of the U.S. Department of Education's evaluation criteria.

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grad rates US by sector

Success rates at colleges and universities not only vary over time, but by sector.

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ntnl grad rates

Nationally, as well as in Ohio, how quickly you graduate depends on the type of college or university you attend.

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fed aid to props

Over a ten-year period, while the amount of federal student aid grants including Pell and loans grew by more 150 percent, the amount of this student aid received by for-profit higher education institutions nearly quintupled and their share of the total nearly doubled.

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full time faculty

The presence of full-time faculty is one clear sign of the educational quality of a college or university.

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net revenue from tuition

Because of dropping state subsidies, many public universities nationwide had to raise tuition. Without these subsidies, private colleges and universities differed by sector in deciding how much more revenue they needed from students and their families.

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6-year outcomes

More than half of those who enter public or nonprofit 4-year colleges and universities complete their bachelor's degrees, either where they started or at another campus, within six years. At the same time, more than half of those who enter 4-year for-profit institutions receive no award - not even an associate degree or certificate - and have left higher education altogether.

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default rate Ohio v US

Borrowers from Ohio independents have a lower default rate on student loans than their peers nationally. This cannot be said for other sectors, especially for-profit colleges.

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Student success at Ohio's traditional colleges and universities is less reliant on students' ability to borrow.

Note: Credentials include degrees and certificates.

 

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CFOs concerns at for-profits

While business officers at independent nonprofit colleges and universities worry about whether students will come and can afford to attend, at for-profit colleges the key concern is availability of tax money to support their businesses.